Videos & Links

Here is the link to the episode of Note to Self I mentioned — the one where Manoush talks with Antonio García Martínez, the guy who designed Facebook’s ad tracking system.

And (with thanks to Katie), here is a link to an article about newscasters trying to explain emojis, and here is the Samantha Bee video about Trump not being able to read

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Related to Today’s Discussion

Here is the link to the Last Week Tonight clip I mentioned:

Here’s more information about Gamergate if you’re interested.

Please Note: Both the video and the content linked above contain some mention of violence against women. The linked content includes images of tweets with some of the threats folks have received, and the video includes descriptions of some of these threats.

RRB 7: Carter and Arroyo

7With Carter’s and Arroyo’s videos in mind, reflect on and discuss your own composing processes, thinking especially about when you are composing with digital tools (you might think specifically of work in this class, such as the soundscape or Wikipedia project, but you don’t need to focus only on this class). You might choose to compare your own invention and revision processes to those Carter discusses in his video. You might consider potentialities and/or difficulties present in certain composing situations (e.g., Carter says that once he’d produced his video, he was open to the possibility his daughter might accidentally delete or otherwise alter his project). You might consider, like Arroyo does, what other “gestures” or “procedures” are different when we compose digitally (and what about the fact that “digitally” goes back to us using our digits)? Or you may choose to take an entirely different route, as long as you are considering invention and production of digital texts and your own composing processes.

RRB 6: Wikipedia

Again, I want to leave this RRB prompt pretty loose so you have lots of room for personalizing your response. Therefore, I’m going to just restate the broad purpose of RRBs from the syllabus: I will be looking for proof that you understand (or are trying to understand) what we’ve read, for your responses to our readings, and for you to make connections between what we’ve read and other texts and experiences. Connections could be to texts/experiences from our class or from outside of our class, but be sure to give some explanation or context if it’s something from outside our class.

RRB 5:Visual Literacy

http://mentalfloss.com/article/22876/somewhat-more-realistic-cartoon-characters

I want to leave this RRB prompt pretty loose so you have lots of room for personalizing your response. Therefore, I’m going to just restate the broad purpose of RRBs from the syllabus: I will be looking for proof that you understand (or are trying to understand) what we’ve read, for your responses to our readings, and for you to make connections between what we’ve read and other texts and experiences. Connections could be to texts/experiences from our class or from outside of our class, but be sure to give some explanation or context if it’s something from outside our class.

RRB 4: McKee

Link to something provocative that relates to McKee’s text (e.g., a soundscape, something highlighting aspects of sound or challenging our understanding of/relationship to sound) and that you feel would fuel class conversation about the ideas in her text specifically or about the rhetorics of sound, soundscapes, or acoustic ecology more broadly. Incorporate the terminology from McKee’s article to explain why you’ve linked to this text (broadly defined)—that is, what significance it has in helping us to explore and understand rhetorics of sound.

If you’re interested, you can find the Poems that Go visual poems McKee discusses here, “Winter Lyric” here, “New York City: After the Fall” here, and the soundpoems here.

Also, here are the videos I promised to share:

“Sometimes Behaves so Strangely”

“Kanye Deconstructed: The Human Voice as the Ultimate Instrument”

RRB 3: Rice

Rice proposes several terms and phrases he argues are important in an expanded understanding of digital aurality, including “sounding out” (aka “aural”), “voice,” “ka-knowledge,” “the mix,” “to show off,” “breaks,” “juice” or “juicy,” and “droppin’ science” or “new physics.” Choose at least one of these terms to interrogate on a deeper level. What does Rice mean by that word/phrase; how does he understand and explain the term? How do you understand the term? Think about connections, examples, links, etc. you can make to help you fully grasp what the term, as Rice uses it, means.

RRB 2: Brooke & Sheridan, Ridolfo, and Michel

For our second RRB, I’m providing 3 prompts for each text. Choose one to respond to for each text. Feel free to begin/end your post with or integrate any useful/necessary summing up or copying or engaging with key quotes/ideas.

Brooke

  • After reading Brooke’s chapter, how do you understand the term “ecology” and its significance to digital rhetoric?
  • In Eyman’s second chapter on the theory of Digital Rhetoric, he drew heavily on Brooke’s work in parts, and throughout, he discussed several ideas that also come up in Brooke’s text. How does reading Brooke’s chapter help you to better/differently understand an idea from Eyman’s second chapter?
  • Choose a confusing or important moment in the text: copy it, and then provide an analogy, metaphor, anecdote, or other comparison/explanation that helps you (or might help someone else) to understand the main point(s) from that moment in the text.

Sheridan, Ridolfo, and Michel

  • After reading this chapter, how do you understand the term “kairos” and its significance to digital rhetoric?
  • Revisit their discussion of a rhetor’s ability to “ripen the time” on pp. 8-10. What seems to be the root of the discussion here? To what extent do you think a rhetor is able to “ripen the time” of a given text (broadly defined)?
  • Discuss one of the critiques of the Habermasian liberal bourgeois public sphere as SRM discuss it. Summarize what the critique is, and discuss why you think this critique is significant (or not) when we’re thinking about rhetoric in digital spaces.

Welcome!

Hello and welcome, members of WRC 3054: Digital Rhetoric. We have an exciting semester ahead of us full of reading about, discussing, and practicing what it means to be a digital rhetorician.

This website will serve as our shared space this semester. This is where you will find the syllabus, the daily schedule, assignment sheets, occasional updates, links to each other’s blogs (eventually), and more. I recommend you bookmark this page.

I have prepared a list of readings and cooked up what I hope will be some meaningful and engaging projects for us. However, I also look forward to you all bringing your unique interests, passions, and curiosities to bear on all of the work we do, and I hope that will include your suggestions about ways we might alter and improve these proposed readings and activities. No doubt, throughout this semester, you all will be reading and discussing interesting, relevant topics and texts in other classes and on your own; share those with the rest of us! I’d like for us all to support one another and play a part in creating a classroom environment that is characterized by rigorous, creative intellectual pursuits.